Category Archives: St. Gregory of Nyssa

St. Gregory of Nyssa: When God became known to us in the flesh . . .

Icon of the Nativity of Jesus“When God became known to us in the flesh, He neither received the passions of human nature, nor did the Virgin Mary suffer pain, nor was the Holy Spirit diminished in any way, nor was the power of the Most High set aside in any manner, and all this was because all was accomplished by the Holy Spirit. thus the power of the Most High was not abased, and the child was born with no damage whatsoever to the mother’s virginity.”

+ St. Gregory of Nyssa, Against Eunomius, Hom. II, PG 45, 492

St. Gregory of Nyssa: When God revealed himself, he united with our mortal nature . . .

Icon of St. Gregory of Nyssa“When God revealed himself, he united himself with our mortal nature in order to deify humanity through this close relation with deity. Since this is so, through his flesh, constituted by bread and wine, he implants himself in all believers.”

— St. Gregory of Nyssa, Catechetical Oration

St. Gregory of Nyssa: There is no question about that which is bred in the uterus . . .

Icon of St. Gregory of Nyssa“There is no question about that which is bred in the uterus, both growing, and moving from place to place. It remains, therefore, that we must think that the point of commencement of existence is one and the same for body and soul.”

— St. Gregory of Nyssa

St. Gregory of Nyssa: . . . so as to accord in the faith set forth by the Lord of the whole Scripture . . .

Icon of St. Gregory of Nyssa” …and that we might receive the teaching concerning the transcendent nature of the Deity which is given to us, as it were, ‘through a glass darkly’ from the older Scriptures,—from the Law, and the Prophets, and the Sapiential Books, as an evidence of the truth fully revealed to us, reverently accepting the meaning of the things which have been spoken, so as to accord in the faith set forth by the Lord of the whole Scripture, which faith we guard as we received it, word for word, in purity, without falsification, judging even a slight divergence from the words delivered to us an extreme blasphemy and impiety.”

— St. Gregory of Nyssa, Against Eunomius